Asparagus season lasts two to three months. They are going to be there awhile. Asparagus harvesting should begin when the stems are 5 to 8 inches long and as big around as your finger. Gardeners can purchase pre-grown asparagus roots which shortens the wait time by a year, but it is also quite possible to grow your own from seed. Amazing that a single seed matures into those healthy crowns in the first growing season and then returns annually to produce nutritious spears again and again. Such a simple method and much less digging than a trench. Add 1/2 pound of 10-10-10 fertilizer to each 10-foot stretch of trench. If you need further assistance, we're always available to help. You have entered an incorrect email address! My goal is to send one email per month with links to my most recent blog posts, an update on what's growing inside and out, and tips for what you should be planning for and doing in your garden for the month. Learning Download: Common pests and diseases: Asparagus. Planting asparagus from seed allows one to grow any variety of the vegetable, but growing from one year old crowns allows for harvesting asparagus more quickly — three years after planting crowns. Crown and spear rot is caused by over-harvesting, growing in soils that are waterlogged or growing in acidic soil. I had never seen Asparagus “go to seed” because the asparagus crowns purchased from garden centers are all males. Male plants, who devote no energy to seed production, offer thicker and longer spears which are what one desires when harvesting asparagus. In my cold Vermont climate, the last frost happens the first week of June. If you are looking to get asparagus in your first season, you will want to choose a package that reads “3 year” or “3rd year” (these are not that common to find). As you plant the seeds that you saved from open-pollinated varieties of asparagus, those plants will slowly adapt to your specific growing conditions and climate and improve year after year. You can always shoot me an email at: meg@megcowden.com. We are asparagus lovers, devouring it when in season from early May through mid-June, abstaining when it’s not in season. Harvest asparagus when spears are 6 to 9 inches (15-23 cm) long, about the thickness of your index finger, and before the tips begin to separate. And here’s why. The female asparagus plants don’t produce nearly as many edible shoots, and instead, devote their energy to making seed. Knowing when to pick asparagus will result in the most flavorful experience from your crop. Plant them a bit denser than you would crown to allow for some dieback. One female plant inside a patch of males will produce dozens and dozens of viable seed annually. Growing asparagus from seed is totally feasible and fun and I highly recommend it.

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